I am wondering what the general consensus amongst gardeners is about this topic. As I consider plants to be living things, simply pulling them out and turfing them on the trash heap seems wrong to me. But I’ve noticed that landscapers do this without any hesitation, so I am wondering whether its considered PC to do this? I have a few “areas” and plants in my garden that I’ve lived with for some time now and I just don’t like them. What to do? I feel almost as if I was given a puppy for Christmas that gets on my nerves and now I want to ship him off to the nearest shelter … Please tell me its not the same thing? What is the correct way of dealing with unwanted plants that are thriving in one’s garden?

Here are the things I’m not loving in my garden:

Higgeldy Piggedy Lavender DentataLavender Dentata

Plectranthus “Mona Lavender”Plectranthus Mona Lavender

1). Lavender dentata that was planted in a row in the flower bed beside our pool. Each plant seems to do its own thing, grows in a different way and direction, the result is a border of lavender plants that I don’t think look at all attractive. Its a bit of a higgeldy piggledy mess.There are ten of these I’m thinking of pulling out.

2). Plectranthus “Mona Lavender” has soft stems that just break off all the time – just walking past it seems to damage them. They look very bare and uninteresting now that the season is changing and even when they are bloomimg and full in summer … well, lets just say I am not a fan. I don’t mind having a few of them mixed in with the other plants in the back, shade garden (I have a lot there too), but I don’t like them at all in the front garden where there are eight of them in two rows, all in varying sizes, shapes and in varying stages of growth (or decline). I think I could make this look much better with something else.

If any locals happen to read this blog and would like to have these plants, provided you come and fetch them from me you are welcome to have these plants. I’d feel much better if they went to a “loving home” rather than ending up at “the shelter”, aka the compost heap.